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Pink london menswear fashion

  • SS18: Tie waist jackets

    SS18: Tie waist jackets

    This summer the ties womn't be around your neck, they'll be around your waist. While there were field jackets and blousons aplenty at the Spring/Summer 2018 shows in London, one of the more interesting riffs on outerwear came in the form of belted mid-length and longline jackets, cut from light cottons in a variety of wearable colours.

  • SS18: Tie waist jackets

    SS18: Tie waist jackets

    As seen at Topman Design Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Tie waist jackets

    SS18: Tie waist jackets

    As seen at Daniel W Fletcher Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Tie waist jackets

    SS18: Tie waist jackets

    As seen at Chalayan Spring/Summer 2018.

    Indigital
  • SS18: mid-wash denim

    SS18: mid-wash denim

    Perhaps more than ever, jeans were trending at London Fashion Week Men's - even Craig Green, known for his soft-yet-structured quilting showed a pair this season. After the heavily distressed styles of the past few years, the dominant model this time was a loose fit in a Seventies-style mid-wash blue (see: Martine Rose adn Oliver Spencer). However, it wasn't just on jeans - we also saw pleated trousers cur from lighter, more summer-friendly cotton chambray in this shade too - often with fashion a pleat in the centre for extra thigh space, such as at Lou Dalton.

  • SS18: mid-wash denim

    SS18: mid-wash denim

    As seen at Oliver Spencer Spring/Summer 2018.

    Indigital
  • SS18: mid-wash denim

    SS18: mid-wash denim

    As seen at Lou Dalton Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: mid-wash denim

    SS18: mid-wash denim

    As seen at Martine Rose Spring/Summer 2018.

    Firstview
  • SS18: Playing with layers

    SS18: Playing with layers

    It's not just about the colours of clothing on the catwalk, it's also about how you wear it. One of the most notable trends yesterday was an inversion of the traditional rules of layering. Usually the longest layer goes on top, but on day 3 of London Fashion Week Men's we saw the longest layer being used as the one closest to the body and then shorter layers on top. One of the most effective executions of this was in the line-up at Astrid Anderson, where a striped bomber-style tracksuit was paired up with a longline T-shirt underneath. If you want to make your favourite tracksuit feel fresh, this is the menswear move you need to steal for next season.

    Indigital
  • SS18: Playing with layers

    SS18: Playing with layers

    As seen at Alex Mullins Spring/Summer 2018.

    Indigital
  • SS18: Playing with layers

    SS18: Playing with layers

    As seen at Astrid Andersen Spring/Summer 2018.

    Indigital
  • SS18: Playing with layers

    SS18: Playing with layers

    As seen at Maison Mihara Yasuhiro Spring/Summer 2018.

    Indigital
  • SS18: Brit-Pop sunglasses

    SS18: Brit-Pop sunglasses

    Moving away from the round tea sunglasses that rose to popularity with John Lennon in the '70s and were seen in SS17 runway shows in previous seasons, the smaller frame, square-shaped sunglasses synonymous with '90s Brit Pop are making a comeback both on the runway and in street style shots. Daniel W Fletcher and Charles Jeffrey are just some of the brands using these iconic pieces, typically worn a little further down the nose for a more authentic look, along with coloured lenses for a pop of colour. Angelo Mitakos

    Ben Parks
  • SS18: Vertical stripes

    SS18: Vertical stripes

    If yesterday was all about graphic, abstract prints, day two at London Fashion Week men's was all about far more ordered patterns. With the exception of up and comers like Charles Jeffrey Loverboy and Art School at the MAN show (who both brought bold, chaotic prints to the catwalk), vertical stripes emerged victorious. Particular highlights included E Tautz's louche cream and navy pinstripe safari jacket, the thick lines of Songzio's hand-painted suits and the broken up stripes on Qasimi's navy and claret summer blouson. In short, next summer: get in line.

  • SS18: Vertical stripes

    SS18: Vertical stripes

    As seen at E Tautz Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Vertical stripes

    SS18: Vertical stripes

    As seen at Songzio Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Vertical stripes

    SS18: Vertical stripes

    As seen at Qasimi Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    It’s always amazing how, even with such a diverse set of designers showing on first day of London Fashion Week Men’s, trends still emerge. This season, the first big one appears to be block colour worn head to toe. However, what remains to be seen at this stage is what sort of colour trend will dominate for next summer: will it be the zingy, bold brights at Berthold (yellow) and Phoebe English Man (electric blue), or the ice cream pastels at Oliver Spencer (strawberry pink) and Xander Zhou (pistachio green). Only time will tell. Game on.

  • SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    As seen at Oliver Spencer Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    As seen at Berthold Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    As seen at Xander Zhou Spring/Summer 2018.

  • SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    SS18: Head-to-toe tones

    As seen at Phoebe English Man Spring/Summer 2018

  • AW17: Camo is the season's most conspicuous pattern

    AW17: Camo is the season's most conspicuous pattern

    Camouflage is one of those patterns that never really goes away - it merely bubbles under the surface of menswear waiting to break out every few seasons. So what makes it so different this time? In short, it's the way you wear it. While previous seasons have concentrated on the "prepification" of the print (a few years ago we saw it go mainstream on suits, ties and umbrellas), for Autumn/Winter 2017 its headed in a far more casual, street-orientated direction. While wearing it as a matching head-to-toe look might be only for the boldest among us, make sure you pick up a baseball cap, T-shirt or, our personal favourite, a field jacket popping with the pattern.

    Above: Liam Hodges.

    Firstview
  • AW17: Camo is the season's most conspicuous pattern

    AW17: Camo is the season's most conspicuous pattern

    Camouflage is one of those patterns that never really goes away - it merely bubbles under the surface of menswear waiting to break out every few seasons. So what makes it so different this time? In short, it's the way you wear it. While previous seasons have concentrated on the "prepification" of the print (a few years ago we saw it go mainstream on suits, ties and umbrellas), for Autumn/Winter 2017 its headed in a far more casual, street-orientated direction. While wearing it as a matching head-to-toe look might be only for the boldest among us, make sure you pick up a baseball cap, T-shirt or, our personal favourite, a field jacket popping with the pattern.

    Above: Nigel Cabourn.

    Firstview
  • AW17: Camo is the season's most conspicuous pattern

    AW17: Camo is the season's most conspicuous pattern

    Camouflage is one of those patterns that never really goes away - it merely bubbles under the surface of menswear waiting to break out every few seasons. So what makes it so different this time? In short, it's the way you wear it. While previous seasons have concentrated on the "prepification" of the print (a few years ago we saw it go mainstream on suits, ties and umbrellas), for Autumn/Winter 2017 its headed in a far more casual, street-orientated direction. While wearing it as a matching head-to-toe look might be only for the boldest among us, make sure you pick up a baseball cap, T-shirt or, our personal favourite, a field jacket popping with the pattern.

    Above: Maharishi.

  • AW17: Highlighter colours are trending

    AW17: Highlighter colours are trending

    Next season's big colour rule? If you find it in a Stabilo Boss four pack, it's bang-on trend. Neon shades of green, pink and orange were seen across the board at the shows for Autumn/Winter 2017, but no colour was more popular than fizzing electric yellow. However, before you go investing in a full Nineties-style neon tracksuit, make a note that the easiest way to wear these colours is by looking for items that contain a burst of the hue rather than going hard on it head-to-toe.

    Above: Christopher Shannon.

    Firstview
  • AW17: Highlighter colours are trending

    AW17: Highlighter colours are trending

    Next season's big colour rule? If you find it in a Stabilo Boss four pack, it's bang-on trend. Neon shades of green, pink and orange were seen across the board at the shows for Autumn/Winter 2017, but no colour was more popular than fizzing electric yellow. However, before you go investing in a full Nineties-style neon tracksuit, make a note that the easiest way to wear these colours is by looking for items that contain a burst of the hue rather than going hard on it head-to-toe.

    Above: Casely-Hayford.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Highlighter colours are trending

    AW17: Highlighter colours are trending

    Next season's big colour rule? If you find it in a Stabilo Boss four pack, it's bang-on trend. Neon shades of green, pink and orange were seen across the board at the shows for Autumn/Winter 2017, but no colour was more popular than fizzing electric yellow. However, before you go investing in a full Nineties-style neon tracksuit, make a note that the easiest way to wear these colours is by looking for items that contain a burst of the hue rather than going hard on it head-to-toe.

    Above: Christopher Raeburn.

    Firstview
  • AW17: Rollnecks are rolling over to autumn

    AW17: Rollnecks are rolling over to autumn

    With the rise and rise of sport-style zip-ups over the past two seasons, us guys have been hiding our necks for some time now - and it looks like we'll continue to do so for at least another season, albeit in a far woolier fashion. Rollnecks were prolific across the catwalks, knitted thick and often worn slightly oversized as a top layer in their own right. Our tip? Go for a size up next season.

    Above: Oliver Spencer.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Rollnecks are rolling over to autumn

    AW17: Rollnecks are rolling over to autumn

    With the rise and rise of sport-style zip-ups over the past two seasons, us guys have been hiding our necks for some time now - and it looks like we'll continue to do so for at least another season, albeit in a far woolier fashion. Rollnecks were prolific across the catwalks, knitted thick and often worn slightly oversized as a top layer in their own right. Our tip? Go for a size up next season.

    Above: JW Anderson.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Casely Hayford

    AW17: Casely Hayford

    With the rise and rise of sport-style zip-ups over the past two seasons, us guys have been hiding our necks for some time now - and it looks like we'll continue to do so for at least another season, albeit in a far woolier fashion. Rollnecks were prolific across the catwalks, knitted thick and often worn slightly oversized as a top layer in their own right. Our tip? Go for a size up next season.

    Above: Casely-Hayford.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Pyjamas you can wear after sunrise

    AW17: Pyjamas you can wear after sunrise

    Pimped-up PJs emerged as a big trend in womenswear last year, and this season it looks like guys will be getting in on the action too. From Katie Eary’s come-to-bed couture (in the words of our Fashion Director Robert Johnston) to Per Götesson’s baggy black sets and Edward Crutchley’s bright orange offering, the silk shirts and trousers we saw might have been inspired by after-dark sleepwear, but were intended to be worn outside of the bedroom.

    Above: Katie Eary.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Pyjamas you can wear after sunrise

    AW17: Pyjamas you can wear after sunrise

    Pimped-up PJs emerged as a big trend in womenswear last year, and this season it looks like guys will be getting in on the action too. From Katie Eary’s come-to-bed couture (in the words of our Fashion Director Robert Johnston) to Per Götesson’s baggy black sets and Edward Crutchley’s bright orange offering, the silk shirts and trousers we saw might have been inspired by after-dark sleepwear, but were intended to be worn outside of the bedroom.

    Above: Per Götesson at MAN.

    Chris Yates
  • AW17: Pyjamas you can wear after sunrise

    AW17: Pyjamas you can wear after sunrise

    Pimped-up PJs emerged as a big trend in womenswear last year, and this season it looks like guys will be getting in on the action too. From Katie Eary’s come-to-bed couture (in the words of our Fashion Director Robert Johnston) to Per Götesson’s baggy black sets and Edward Crutchley’s bright orange offering, the silk shirts and trousers we saw might have been inspired by after-dark sleepwear, but were intended to be worn outside of the bedroom.

    Above: Edward Crutchley.

  • AW17: Moss bros

    AW17: Moss bros

    For those who aren't tempted by the zingy highlighter shades we mentioned earlier, deep, dark mossy green is another of your Autumn/Winter 2017 alternatives. This classically masculine colour was seen across the catwalks, generally on fabrics like boiled wool that added an extra level of texture to the hue. The best bit? This sort of green works well on all skin colours, meaning you've got no excuse to give it a try.

    Above: E Tautz.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Moss bros

    AW17: Moss bros

    For those who aren't tempted by the zingy highlighter shades we mentioned earlier, deep, dark mossy green is another of your Autumn/Winter 2017 alternatives. This classically masculine colour was seen across the catwalks, generally on fabrics like boiled wool that added an extra level of texture to the hue. The best bit? This sort of green works well on all skin colours, meaning you've got no excuse to give it a try.

    Above: Oliver Spencer.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Moss bros

    AW17: Moss bros

    For those who aren't tempted by the zingy highlighter shades we mentioned earlier, deep, dark mossy green is another of your Autumn/Winter 2017 alternatives. This classically masculine colour was seen across the catwalks, generally on fabrics like boiled wool that added an extra level of texture to the hue. The best bit? This sort of green works well on all skin colours, meaning you've got no excuse to give it a try.

    Above: Craig Green.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Wear your art on your sleeve (or chest or trouser leg)

    AW17: Wear your art on your sleeve (or chest or trouser leg)

    Whether it was painted denim jeans, collage patterns or colour-burst graffiti graphics, art-inspired prints were trending hard at London Fashion Week Men's. The only rule? Go hard or go home and choose bold statement pieces.

    Above: Alex Mullins.

    Firstview
  • AW17: Wear your art on your sleeve (or chest or trouser leg)

    AW17: Wear your art on your sleeve (or chest or trouser leg)

    Whether it was painted denim jeans, collage patterns or colour-burst graffiti graphics, art-inspired prints were trending hard at London Fashion Week Men's. The only rule? Go hard or go home and choose bold statement pieces.

    Above: Topman Design.

    Indigital
  • AW17: Wear your art on your sleeve (or chest or trouser leg)

    AW17: Wear your art on your sleeve (or chest or trouser leg)

    Whether it was painted denim jeans, collage patterns or colour-burst graffiti graphics, art-inspired prints were trending hard at London Fashion Week Men's. The only rule? Go hard or go home and choose bold statement pieces.

    Above: Vivienne Westwood.

  • AW17: Time to tuck

    AW17: Time to tuck

    We've seen tucked in T-shirts at the men's shows, but now it's not just T-shirts being slipped into slacks. Christopher Shannon gave us tucked-in hoodies, while Liam Hodges and Agi & Sam gave us tucked-in, layered long-sleeved T-shirts. Start your sit-ups now, gentlemen.

    Above: Christopher Shannon.

    Firstview
  • AW17: Time to tuck

    AW17: Time to tuck

    We've seen tucked in T-shirts at the men's shows, but now it's not just T-shirts being slipped into slacks. Christopher Shannon gave us tucked-in hoodies, while Liam Hodges and Agi & Sam gave us tucked-in, layered long-sleeved T-shirts. Start your sit-ups now, gentlemen.

    Above: Agi & Sam.



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